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Port Out, Starboard Home

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McConnell, Mitch (2020-06-03). "S.3548 - 116th Congress (2019-2020): CARES Act". www.congress.gov . Retrieved 2020-10-02. Whether he’s dealing with truth or tall tales, Quinion aims to provide the whole ball of wax, and as an etymologizer he more than cuts the mustard.” (Jan Freeman, Boston Globe, 10 Oct. 2004) Port and starboard are nautical terms for watercraft, aircraft and spacecraft, referring respectively to the left and right sides of the vessel, when aboard and facing the bow (front). POSH — • Port Out Starboard Home • Prevention of Sexual Harassment … Maritime acronyms and abbreviations Port Out, Starboard Home — (or Port Outward, Starboard Home) is a phrase popularly believed to provide the etymology for the word . According to this belief, Port Out and Starboard Home were the most desirable cabin locations on ships traveling to and from British colonies … Wikipedia

The Virginia Apgar Papers - Obstetric Anesthesia and a Scorecard for Newborns, 1949-1958". U.S. National Library of Medicine, NIH . Retrieved 2008-11-18. Port and starboard are traditional nautical terms, which are also represented by the colours red and green respectively. Slang and Its Analogues Past and Present provided Henley with material for his extra-ordinary translations of Villon: Administration, US Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric. "Unlike left and right, port and starboard refer to fixed locations on a vessel". oceanservice.noaa.gov . Retrieved October 12, 2017. {{ cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list ( link)a b RMG Staff (February 2, 2017). "Port and Starboard: Why do Sailors say 'Port' and 'Starboard', for "Left" and "Right?" ". Discover: Explore by Theme. Greenwich, England, UK: Royal Museums Greenwich. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015 . Retrieved February 2, 2017– via RMG.co.uk. posh — [20] Although it only appeared as recently as the early 20th century, posh is one of the oldest chestnuts of English etymology. The story got around that it was an acronym for port out, starboard home, an allusion to the fact that wealthy… … The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

Vessels with bilateral symmetry have left and right halves which are mirror images of each other. One asymmetric feature is where access to a boat, ship, or aircraft is at the side, it is usually only on the port side (hence the name).

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The History of Yahoo! - How It All Started..." Yahoo.com. 2001. Archived from the original on 29 November 2001 . Retrieved 8 November 2015.

That means that all coaching materials will now refer to port and starboard as standardised terminology, and the terms could eventually be written onto blade shafts across the country. Quinion’s chatty and erudite book should sit nicely next to Fowler, Brewer and Partridge.” (Dianne Dempsey, The Age, Melbourne, 2 Oct. 2004.) Then, towards the end of the nineteenth century, an alternate meaning of ‘posh’ arose, again from that constant stream of living language, slang. Once again, this ‘posh’ was a noun rather than the more familiar adjective we use today, although, interestingly, this ‘posh’ referred to a dandy: a well-dressed, and often well-off, man about town. Among other sources, this ‘posh’ appears in the 1902 book Slang and Its Analogues Past and Present, compiled by John S. Farmer and William Ernest Henley (the latter of whom was the author of the poem ‘ Invictus’ as well as the inspiration for the character Long John Silver).Many phrases that have been adopted into everyday use originate from seafaring - in particular from the days of sail. Virtually all of these are metaphorical and the original nautical meanings are now forgotten. Bump, Philip (August 2, 2013). "All the Silly Legislative Acronyms Congress Came Up with This Year". The Atlantic. Port and starboard unambiguously refer to the left and right side of the vessel, not the observer. That is, the port side of the vessel always refers to the same portion of the vessel's structure, and does not depend on which way the observer is facing. The terms will replace references to ‘stroke side’ and ‘bow side’, which have also been used in place of ‘left’ and ‘right’ from the cox’s point of view.

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